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hi im alec and im pretty rad



deercharm:

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Does Skype
power yo…
Become…

dorkball-mcgee:

dorkball-mcgee:

Why did Stan Lee make a cameo in The Princess Diaries 2? Was this foreshadowing Disney buying Marvel? Is Princess Mia going to be an Avenger? So many questions

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In case you though I was joking

hyper-attractive-fucker:

kelpftw:

littlebluboxx:

silentauroriamthereal:

nofreedomlove:

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"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

Oooh. I reblogged a partial version of this recently but I didn’t know how many more there were! I LOVE these!

OK SO THERE ARE TONS MORE OF THESE OF THE ARTISTS FB PAGE. GUYS THESE ARE AWESOME.image

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LETS APPLAUD CAROL ROSSETTI EVERYONEimage

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LOOK

All of these are so beautiful <3 

I’m printing these off and making a book for my children

goodnight

ayabereito:

A tiny collection of Mami’s cute outfits from the Different Story! (´∀`)♡

pinkgermy:

Pokemon of the week number 11 on Pokegraph’s board 

pinkgermy:

Pokemon of the week number 11 on Pokegraph’s board 

elirya:

"Perhaps I should just get Joffrey to choose it for me. End up with a string of dead sparrow heads around my neck."

ladyxgaga:

Lady Gaga: “It’s a very happy time in my life.”

After hip surgery and parting ways with her longtime manager, Lady Gaga says things are looking up.

"I’ve very centered now. I meditate a lot. I’m happy. I am more sober than I’ve ever been," the singer said interview this week. "It’s a very happy time in my life.Part of what was making my sort of artistic experience so unpleasant was that I felt that I was not able to truly freely fly as an artist," she said. "In some ways my talents were not being used to their full potential."

Gaga says part of her happier state of mind comes from working with Tony Bennett on the album “Cheek to Cheek,” out on Tuesday.

AP: You sound like you’re in a good place. Is that spilling over to the new music you’re creating?

Gaga: It is in the very super early stages. I’m always writing music. I was up all the other night here in Istanbul writing and they had a lovely piano in my room and I was so excited, especially when I get to pay a real stringed piano, not an electronic one, that always makes me happy. I’ve been writing some records that I really sort of surprised at myself. I have a lot of pain built over the past few years. It was very difficult being on the road for this “Born This Way Ball” without having a full, proper team around me. I was going through a lot of pain with my body that led to the hip surgery. I call it the “Pain of fame.” …Your life changes a lot and the people that around you, they change too. Money makes people crazy and they see your life change and all of the luxuries and the things that come with becoming a star and they think, “I’ve known her my whole life … or I’ve been here this whole time, I deserve all of that too.”

AP: U2 released its new album alongside Apple, and Jay Z and Beyonce also released recent albums in unconventional ways. What do you think about that and do you think of innovative ways to release music when readying a project?

Gaga: I think honestly what we need to be doing, and this is my opinion, is instead of trying to find ways to trick the world into focusing on the album for a brief moment, I think that artists need to speak more about how media treats the artists and making the distinction between the celebrity and the artist, because everything is all in one pool now isn’t it? We’re all the same and they’re some pretty terrible celebrities out there, let’s be honest, right? People famous for no reason. So, I think the more the media can help us to support the artist and support music in a way that’s maybe less critical for journalists that are not as knowledgeable about music and help to just spread the music and see the music as gift to the world.

I really believe that once the press becomes more kind I think a lot of the things in the universe are going to change. It makes me scared when I hear that there’s pro-ISIS (Islamic State in Syria) rallies in America because I think that social media has created this sort of negative undertone in the universe. People feel that they can say or do anything; it makes them feel a sort of comfort when really it’s just giving hatred a petri dish to fester. I know that was sort of a random answer for a question about album marketing. I really believe it lies in the hearts in the people that are writing about the music. The more we honor and support the artist, the more the art will live on forever. Otherwise, it’s going to continue to be what I think pop music is now, which is sort of this giant tabloid. It’s become quite trashy in my opinion.

Associate Press (full interview)

ladyxgaga:


Lady Gaga: “It’s a very happy time in my life.”
After hip surgery and parting ways with her longtime manager, Lady Gaga says things are looking up.
"I’ve very centered now. I meditate a lot. I’m happy. I am more sober than I’ve ever been," the singer said interview this week. "It’s a very happy time in my life.Part of what was making my sort of artistic experience so unpleasant was that I felt that I was not able to truly freely fly as an artist," she said. "In some ways my talents were not being used to their full potential."
Gaga says part of her happier state of mind comes from working with Tony Bennett on the album “Cheek to Cheek,” out on Tuesday.
AP: You sound like you’re in a good place. Is that spilling over to the new music you’re creating?
Gaga: It is in the very super early stages. I’m always writing music. I was up all the other night here in Istanbul writing and they had a lovely piano in my room and I was so excited, especially when I get to pay a real stringed piano, not an electronic one, that always makes me happy. I’ve been writing some records that I really sort of surprised at myself. I have a lot of pain built over the past few years. It was very difficult being on the road for this “Born This Way Ball” without having a full, proper team around me. I was going through a lot of pain with my body that led to the hip surgery. I call it the “Pain of fame.” …Your life changes a lot and the people that around you, they change too. Money makes people crazy and they see your life change and all of the luxuries and the things that come with becoming a star and they think, “I’ve known her my whole life … or I’ve been here this whole time, I deserve all of that too.”
AP: U2 released its new album alongside Apple, and Jay Z and Beyonce also released recent albums in unconventional ways. What do you think about that and do you think of innovative ways to release music when readying a project?
Gaga: I think honestly what we need to be doing, and this is my opinion, is instead of trying to find ways to trick the world into focusing on the album for a brief moment, I think that artists need to speak more about how media treats the artists and making the distinction between the celebrity and the artist, because everything is all in one pool now isn’t it? We’re all the same and they’re some pretty terrible celebrities out there, let’s be honest, right? People famous for no reason. So, I think the more the media can help us to support the artist and support music in a way that’s maybe less critical for journalists that are not as knowledgeable about music and help to just spread the music and see the music as gift to the world.
I really believe that once the press becomes more kind I think a lot of the things in the universe are going to change. It makes me scared when I hear that there’s pro-ISIS (Islamic State in Syria) rallies in America because I think that social media has created this sort of negative undertone in the universe. People feel that they can say or do anything; it makes them feel a sort of comfort when really it’s just giving hatred a petri dish to fester. I know that was sort of a random answer for a question about album marketing. I really believe it lies in the hearts in the people that are writing about the music. The more we honor and support the artist, the more the art will live on forever. Otherwise, it’s going to continue to be what I think pop music is now, which is sort of this giant tabloid. It’s become quite trashy in my opinion.

— Associate Press (full interview)